Hearts of Gold

If your calling lies in caring for others, the NHG scholarship can help you realise your mission and benefit many people along the way.

By Lim Yan Wen

If you’re meeting her for the first time, one of the first things you would notice about Audrey Tan is her serene demeanour. But once this 22-year-old opens up about her passion for nursing, her heart of gold and soft-spoken determination quickly shine through.

Audrey’s interest in nursing developed in her secondary school days, when she was a member of St John Ambulance Brigade. “Apart from my involvement in St John Ambulance Brigade, I also wanted to take care of my parents and grandparents and not feel helpless when they're sick,” Audrey explains.

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Pursuing a PhD

Most university graduates here choose to enter the workforce after obtaining their degrees, but some go on to pursue a PhD. What exactly does a PhD education involve?

By Nabilah Husna A. Rahman

“It is a common joke that with a PhD education, you may end up being called a doctor, but not the kind that can help people,” shares Dr Jonathan Loh Yuin-Han, a research fellow with the Children’s Hospital Boston at Harvard Medical School.

PhD – an abbreviated form of ‘Doctor of Philosophy’ – is the highest possible academic qualification one can attain in most English-speaking countries. While it is true that you may end up being called a doctor, a PhD education can provide you with much more, including an array of professional opportunities that could lead to a fulfilling career in the research industry for instance.

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Going Native: The Pros and Cons of Studying Overseas

Some students relish in the idea of ‘breaking free’ from the supposed confines of local education at university level, while others prefer the comforts and familiarity of the Singaporean lifestyle and academia. We find out exactly what appeals to both groups, and why.

By Tan Yan Shuo

An overseas university education in Australia, the United Kingdom (UK) or the United States of America (US) can easily set you back by several hundred thousand dollars. In comparison, the National University of Singapore (NUS), Nanyang Technological University (NTU) and Singapore Management University (SMU) all charge an annual tuition fee of less than S$10,000. Yet, every year, thousands of Singaporean students flock to universities in these countries.

You may be considering studying overseas too. However, before you jump on the bandwagon, it is important to examine your motivations for wanting to do so, and to ask yourself if they are justified. And most of all, to make a better, informed decision, you need to be elucidated on the major differences between studying overseas and locally.

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In Command

LTC Ho Yung Peng may be more senior compared to CPT Janice Quek, but both RSAF scholars take immense pride in the work they do for the nation.

By Cheryl Tay

He is a fighter pilot with the Republic of Singapore Air Force (RSAF) and defends our skies at the frontline. However, besides flying an advanced multi-role fighter aircraft, Lieutenant-Colonel Ho Yung Peng also commands a squadron of air crew and logistic personnel in operations and training.

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A Soldier’s Passion

SAF Overseas scholar Major Lin Maoyu may be the exemplary all-rounder, but it is passion that makes the difference in his career as an Army officer.

By Azhar Jalil

As a staff officer assigned to plan the Army’s future force structure, Major Lin Maoyu has to balance numerous considerations in order to recommend the best way to deploy the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF)’s limited resources. While certainly a daunting task, 28-year-old Maoyu cites “passion” as the key factor in choosing his vocation.

“The most important quality is to have passion for the job. You need to believe in what you do and derive meaning from your profession. As long as you have the passion, you'll naturally want to do your best and excelling at your job follows naturally,” he enthuses.

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The Men Behind the Win

The Singapore Sports Council grooms future movers and shakers in the national sporting arena.

By Ashley Choo

The enthusiastic camera flashes, the appreciative crowd roars and on the podium, the winning sportsman pumps his fist in the air. The glory, the pride was his and his alone. But is it?

Sometimes, it’s easy to forget a win in the sporting arena is more than just a one-man show. Although determination and passion still count for sporting individuals, increasingly, winning has become a combination of factors and people equipped with much sophisticated knowledge and capabilities.

Joel Pang and Eesha Shah understand just that. Having been exposed to competitive sports in their early teens - Joel in Sailing and Eesha in Tennis - both realise the important roles such influences like sports psychology and sports industry development play on a team’s performance. So when the opportunity arose, it was easy for them to decide on the scholarship offered by the Singapore Sports Council (SSC).

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A Blooming Career in the Garden City

A scholar from NParks shares his journey from studying in Australia to working as a Parks Manager today.

Contributed by Ryan Lee, NParks Scholar

Upon finding out that I was majoring in leisure studies at university, my friends all produced the same startled reaction. “Leisure studies? Why do you need to learn about having fun?”

I soon got used to such expressions of surprise and disbelief. After all, to the uninitiated, leisure studies may come across as an unusual field of study. In reality, the management of recreation is a diverse field that requires an extensive depth of specialised knowledge. The NParks scholarship offered me the unique chance to explore this intriguing academic domain, where leisure and recreation is researched, analysed and debated in a structured and systematic manner.

During my childhood, I was fortunate to spend six years living in one of the last surviving kampongs in Singapore. My family home was surrounded by greenery and my father planted fruit trees providing a steady supply of tropical fruits. Naturally, I developed a love for nature and the outdoors, as well as a keen interest in exploring the rich flora and fauna in Singapore. I was thus eager to apply for a scholarship with NParks, with the aim of pursuing a career in this area.

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A Passion for Communications

Championing the government’s mission to enhance public communications and engage Singaporeans are two ladies who thrive on the pulse of information.

By Tang Pin-Ji

From the tender age of 12, Lim Weilin has aspired to work in the dynamic world of media. Although her aspirations shifted from journalism to media relations, her determination and thirst for uncovering the truth never wavered.

Curious to find out firsthand how the government handles the media, Weilin wrote to the Deputy Director of Media Relations from the Ministry of Information, Communication and the Arts (MICA) to secure a student internship with the organisation.

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More than Just an Education

Beyond just a privileged education, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) scholarship is also committed to your holistic development. The belief in providing scholars with a supportive environment and a wealth of opportunities are cornerstones of MFA’s scholarship programmes.

By Cheryl Tay

A scholarship with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) leads to a career as Foreign Service Officers. This may seem prestigious and glamorous to most, with opportunities to travel and meet important people, representing Singapore at the global arena. While the work of safeguarding and advancing Singapore’s interest is challenging, the learning curve is steep and the work demanding. However, our scholars will never find themselves on their own; MFA grooms its scholars with a comprehensive slew of development programmes that will help them be ready for future challenges. Support and encouragement are also never far away.

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Housing The Future

In land-scarce Singapore, accommodating the ever-increasing population within the boundaries of our geographical constraints is a daunting task. But HDB scholar Gwee Cai Lin is up to the challenge.

By Eugene Lim

From the 32nd storey of HDB Hub in Toa Payoh, one has a stunning view of Singapore's landscape, adorned with harmonious clusters of HDB flats reaching toward the skies. Within a brief span of two generations, the Republic, from her humble background of squatters and slums, has developed into a vibrant metropolis with a large majority of her citizens owning their homes. The Housing & Development Board (HDB) is a key organisation behind this exceptional transformation.

A new addition to the HDB team which tackles the challenge of meeting the housing needs and aspirations of Singapore's steadily expanding population, is Gwee Cai Lin. Fuelled by a passion for environmental issues, Cai Lin opted to study Environmental Engineering in NUS, a relatively new course at that time.

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