Eliza Hamizah

Global Business Leaders

Left: Desmond Yeo | Right: Yeoh Mei Ling

Despite being a mere little red dot on the map, Singapore’s companies are making waves on the global scene. Helping them make a name for themselves overseas are the officers of IE Singapore. We speak to two of them and find out what exactly they do to contribute to Singapore’s economy.

By Eliza Hamizah

Shape the course of Singapore’s economy, create jobs for thousands of Singaporeans, and travel the globe to rub shoulders with some of the world’s top business and political leaders.

That, in a nutshell, is the world of International Enterprise (IE) Singapore. For those keen on such a life, the IE Singapore Undergraduate Scholarship provides its recipients with invaluable experiences.

Two IE Singapore scholars, Yeoh Mei Ling and Desmond Yeo, take some time off their busy schedules and tell us how the scholarship has led them on the adventure of their lives, where the world is their oyster.

Abundant Opportunities
Squeezing in a quick interview with us before he rushes to an important meeting with China government officials, 26-year-old Desmond reveals that he sought the scholarship as it would expose him to international business and allow him to meet and interact with top industry leaders.

Desmond Yeo: “IE Singapore gave me opportunities to study in New York, Shanghai and Tokyo. It was amazing.”

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Big Vessels, Bigger Prospects

Keppel has always done it the big way. Not only is it one of the world’s largest offshore and marine groups, Keppel Offshore & Marine deals with megastructures such as rigs, FPSO vessels, and specialised ships. We get a sneak peek at what goes on behind the scenes.

By Eliza Hamizah

As the cab drove past Pioneer Sector Rd and into Keppel Shipyard’s Tuas Yard, I was greeted by machinery, workshops and vessels that made the men around them look minuscule in size.

Complete with its own zebra crossing and traffic lights, Keppel Shipyard is home to a workforce of over 4,000 who travel around on bicycles. Safety signs are plastered on the interior and exterior of the workshops that dot the shipyard, reminding workers that safety is first and should never be ignored.

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The Pulse of Electricity

Left: Alvin Lim Jun Leng | Right: Koh Xiao Han

We flick on the switch and the lights come on. Our fingers press on the remote control and the television comes to life. These are all things we take for granted in our daily lives but behind that flick of the switch is a tireless team that ensures we continually get reliable and quality electrical supply. We meet two Singapore Power scholars who tell us what it takes to keep Singapore illuminated.

By Eliza Hamizah

When was the last time you experienced a major blackout? If you have to dig deep into your memory to remember the last time you experienced a blackout, you’re not alone. Singapore holds the distinction of having one of the world’s fewest and shortest electricity outages.

Who do we thank for this enviable track record? The humble engineers working behind the scenes at Singapore Power (SP).

Working round the clock, they ensure that SP’s network equipment is well-maintained so that customers receive a continuous and efficient supply of electricity. SP engineers also play a part in powering our country’s economy. The electricity network is constantly undergoing expansion to provide electrical supply to new residential, commercial and industrial users.

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Heart of Lions

Major (MAJ) Jamalullail Ishak

The SCDF is more than just brave firefighters and rescuers with hearts of lions. It also includes men who represent Singapore in the international civil defence arena.

By Eliza Hamizah

“In international relations, there is a saying that goes ‘There are no permanent friends, only permanent interests’, Major Jamalullail Ishak says, chuckling. “So it’s crucial that you learn to adapt and be on your feet!”

For most people, sitting behind a desk emblazoned with the Singapore flag while representing the interest of the nation might feel like being in a pressure cooker. Not for this 34-year-old who stays coolheaded during such important international meetings.
Such is expected of International Relations Officers (IROs) like Jamalullail. He discusses policies and matters of fire and rescue missions with ministers, experts in the field of disaster management, and organisations like the United Nations (UN), and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).

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A Devotion to the Arts and Heritage

Left: Dominic Low | Right: Kok Tse Wei

With the push towards greater recognition in the creative industries, more and more creative professionals are getting the recognition that they truly deserve. We meet two scholars who reveal more about the burgeoning arts and heritage sectors.

By Eliza Hamizah

“It’s a misconception that local talent equals to bad talent. I’ve seen many gifted local youth designers, artists, filmmakers, and musicians,” enthuses Kok Tse Wei.

The 30-year-old, who is a serious weekend trombonist with a local wind orchestra, is the Assistant Director for Youth Arts in the National Art Council. His role places him in the perfect position to make such a statement; he talks to fellow arts enthusiasts, organises festivals, meets youths in talent auditions, and shapes the arts landscape by influencing and formulating policies.

Another common myth that 21-year-old Dominic Low wants to dispel is that someone in the creative industries has to be ‘arty-farty’.

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The Art of Communication

Effective communication is said to be the pillar of everything we do. Miscommunication has more than often resulted in chaos and unnecessary panic. To ensure Singapore doesn’t suffer such a fate, MICA ensures that the Government conveys its key priorities to its people through a variety of communication channels.

By Eliza Hamizah

When I walked into Bey Mui Leng’s office, she was busy sending out an email to one of the divisions at the Ministry of Health (MOH). After a cheerful hello and a hasty apology, she promised to devote her full attention to us to share more about the Information Service (IS).

“There is so much to share that I wouldn’t do justice to the IS in just half an hour!” Mui Leng laughs.

Smiling, Mui Leng explained that she had been kept busy over the past two days as the Ministry had to conduct a technical briefing on tuberculosis (TB).

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