Leadership

When Your Employees' Transgressions Become Your Own

By Desiree Yang

A company’s employees are a reflection of management and their unique brand of leadership – they are essentially the management’s responsibility. Hence, when an employee makes a mistake, a portion of the blame will always land squarely on the shoulders of management no matter the nature or severity of the blunder. And since it is near impossible for managers to be aware of every single thing that goes on in their department – especially if it is a large one – it is indeed a bitter pill to swallow when they find themselves having to answer for their employees’ missteps. Fortunately, there are practical steps that managers can take to tackle such sticky situations. (Read More Here!)

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Portfolio 101 for Fresh Grads

Most students prefer to concentrate on the all-important academic aspect and tend to overlook the fact that their portfolio is becoming increasingly important. When adequately prepared, the portfolio can be the key to setting you apart from the other university or job applicants, especially when attending a job fair like the JobsCentral Career and Education Fair 2014.

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Effective Man-Management in the Office

By: Gerald Goh

In the workplace, you may need to manage of a team of co-workers temporarily or on a permanent basis. Regardless of whether they’re your subordinates or of roughly equal rank, effectively leading and supervising an office team is often fraught with potential pitfalls, especially when considering the team’s diverse personalities and conflicting egos.

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The New Gold Standard of Leadership: A Counter-intuitive Approach to Rising from Adversity

By Steve Farber

A while back, I received a distressed email from Ken, a young manager at a high-tech company.

Ken and I had never met, but he had read my first two books and had done his best to apply the ideas and practices of Extreme Leadership to the way he’d led his team. To their culture, their work ethic, their camaraderie. When necessary, Ken told me, they would band together and work hard—10 to 20 hours a day at times—to solve a problem or meet a pressing need. Ken’s wife would cook food for everyone and bring it to the office. They felt like a family, he said, committed to doing great work and devoted to one another’s success. No one ever complained, least of all Ken. At one point, he’d even forgone his bonus so his employees could collect theirs.

And then something happened. A downturn, a re-org, a shift in the management structure—we all know the drill. Ken still had a job, but his position was eliminated. New management full of old ideas came in to oversee the department’s function and the emotional fibers that connected Ken’s team to each other and to their work unraveled.

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