Doing It The British Way

There is a lot more to an international study experience, as two Singaporeans Chan Xin Hui and Chan Cheong Shuen discover during their UK education.

By Cheryl Tay

Going abroad to study has always been viewed as a prestigious opportunity for the rich or the smart. Concerns like overseas living expenses, adaptation to a new culture and potential communication barriers are typical of an overseas education.

But these can be easily addressed and overcome in exchange for a highly-respected internationally-recognised qualification and a higher marketability for employment along with self-developed traits like independence and self-reliance.

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The Waves of Tourism

The benefits of a FIREfly scholarship with STB are bountiful. Scholar Peirui shares about her education and rewarding working experience.

By Nabilah Husna A. Rahman

For four years, Tan Peirui has pursued her interest in the dynamic tourism industry through her scholarship experience with the Singapore Tourism Board (STB). She graduated with a degree in Hospitality Business from the Michigan State University. Her scholarship with STB also allowed her to attain her master’s in Public Administration at the University of Southern California.

“I think when I considered a scholarship back then, I knew I wanted to be in the tourism and hospitality industry,” Peirui enthuses. “At that time, there weren’t a lot of courses in hospitality available – the ones that did were diploma courses, and I wanted a degree in hospitality. Hence the only option was to go overseas.”

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AccURAte Planning

Together with its talented work force, URA strives to continuously enhance Singapore as a great place to live, work and play in.

By Nabilah Husna A. Rahman

The next time you take your usual route to work or to school, observe your surroundings. From ensuring good pedestrian linkages to managing the national conservation programme, the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) plans and facilitates Singapore’s physical development in partnership with the community.

As Singapore’s national land use planning and conservation agency, its key vision is to create a vibrant and sustainable city of distinction. Part of this involves being the development agency for Marina Bay, the new city extension.

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NUS University Scholars Programme

The University Scholars Programme (USP) at the National University of Singapore (NUS) is an interdisciplinary academic programme for NUS undergraduates. Involving students from six different faculties and schools at NUS - Arts and Social Sciences, Business, Computing, Design and Environment, Engineering, and Science, USP students are concurrently enrolled in one of these faculties or schools (their home faculty) and at the USP. They earn 30% of their academic credits in the USP, and 70% in their home faculty or school. Upon successful completion of USP requirements and an honours programme, USP students graduate with an honours degree from their faculty or school, and a certificate that recognises them as University Scholars.

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Flying High with SIA

Securing an SIA scholarship and an opportunity to work for the airline is something that many dream of achieving. In the volatile and massive aviation industry, one needs versatility and an open mind to survive. Two SIA scholars tell us all.

By Cheryl Tay

When he first entered junior college, Anand Chandran took a triple science subject combination to keep his future study options open. He was leaning towards studying medicine at that time, but towards the end of his days in Raffles Junior College, Anand was not prepared to commit to a five-year medicine course. He then made the decision to study economics instead.

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New scholarship for the curious

Professor Winston Koh, programme director of the USP@SMU, tells us more about the new scholarship programme to be launched this August.

By Joyce Lin

In his seven years’ of teaching at Singapore Management University (SMU), Professor Winston Koh, who teaches economics and finance modules there, took into consideration the feedback from some of his top students. The current Interim Dean of SMU’s School of Social Sciences says, “Many of our top students are capable of doing a lot more. They want to be challenged to do more than what is available to them in the curriculum. That was the starting point.”

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Putting the “Cool” into Scholar

Two NTU scholars let us in on their memorable experiences as recipients of the Nanyang Scholarship.

By Joyce Lin

If your perception of a scholar is that of a nerd with thick glasses or a loner quietly studying in the library all day, think again. Eugene Zhuang and Leong Wenyan, two Nanyang scholars, are fine examples of scholars who have successfully balanced both their academic and social lives with aplomb, and are eloquent and passionate about both their academic and personal interests.

Eugene, 23, is a third-year Accountancy undergraduate pursuing a Second Specialisation in Banking & Finance. This Nanyang Scholar has made it to the Dean’s List for two consecutive years (2008 and 2009) and has a stellar résumé listing numerous awards, student activities and internships, placing him ahead of his peers. However, when asked about his achievements, Eugene remains modest and attributes everything to “learning how to prioritise”.

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DBS: Study with a peace of mind

Consider the POSB Further Study Assist to finance your dream of getting a degree.

By Everlyn Lee

As the adage goes, “it is never too old to learn,” and Yue Li Li is the perfect example of a Singaporean who embraces this spirit of lifelong learning. Li Li, currently 38 years old, may be older than many of her peers who are pursuing a Bachelor’s degree, but that did not deter her from going back to school.

In response to the Government’s call for skills upgrading, Li Li, under the encouragements of her supervisors, enrolled in Kaplan Singapore this year to pursue a part-time Bachelor of Science degree programme in Management that will be awarded by the National University of Ireland, Dublin. She has been working tirelessly in the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS) for the past ten years and currently holds the position of a clerical officer within the organisation. A degree, she hopes, will open doors for career advancement in the future.

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First To London, Then The World

A Sime Darby scholar chooses to study overseas to prepare for a career on the global scale.

By Cheak Hong Ian

Cheong Si Jian is one energetic young man who has chosen to leave the familiarity of Singapore to see the world through new eyes.

“I find the Singaporean education system a bit too results-driven. I want to develop my social, leadership, management and communication skills as well,” the 21-year-old declares.

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Good employment rates for university graduates

A good sign for the economy – Most graduates from the three local universities got employed within six months after graduation, a recent MOE survey reveals.

Judging from the 2009 Graduate Employment Survey, Singapore Management University (SMU) graduates seem to be the most sought after – almost all of them obtain employment six months after graduation, and their salaries are generally higher than their counterparts in similar courses from the other two universities.

The highest starting pay goes to graduates from the Information Systems Management programme at SMU, pegged at an average of $3,445. Those who graduated from the course with at least a Cum Laude (with honours) take in up to $3,754.

On the other end of the spectrum, the worst performing course is Environmental Engineering in National University of Singapore (NUS), where only 63.2% of the graduates are hired. On the long run, however, they may do slightly better than graduates from Art, Design & Media in NTU, where only 61.7% manage to get permanent employment. The latter are also one of the lower-paid ones, with only $2,431 as starting pay. Applied Science graduates from NUS followed close behind, scraping the bottom at $2,393.

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